Wheaton Illinois Sports

Dr. Warren Windram has been involved in the medical community in South Florida for 25 years. He graduated with a bachelor's degree in Summa Cum Laude and then earned a master's degree in Physiology of Movement from Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana. He also earned his medical degree from the University of Florida Medical School in Gainesville, Florida.

After receiving surgical training from many renowned foot and foot surgeons, including podiatrists, adult and pediatric orthopaedists, he completed his residency at the University of Florida Medical School in Gainesville, Florida. He then graduated with honors from the Faculty of Podiatric Medicine at Barry University. Immediately after his stay, he was hired as an assistant professor of pediatrics at Florida State University Medical Center, where he served as acting director of podiatrics and surgery until his retirement in 2010. In addition to his co-authors in the Journal of the American Academy of Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgeons (JAPS), he also published the first FDA-approved pilot study on the impact of podiatric surgery on foot injuries in children and adolescents and published an article in Pediatrics in which he called the study "The Role of Foot Injuries in Pediatric and Adult Foot Diseases.

The Journal of the American Academy of Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgeons (JAPS), edited by E. Dalton McGlamry, contains articles on foot injuries in children, adolescents, and adults, and the impact of podiatric surgery on foot diseases in adults.

Dr. Windram is a member of the Board of Trustees of the American Academy of Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgeons (APS) and is also a certified podiatrist at the US Department of Health and Human Services. He is an associate professor of pediatrics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign School of Medicine and has served as a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston.

He is currently an assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign School of Medicine and a member of the board of trustees of the American Academy of Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgeons (APS). He has been director of pediatric podiatry at Florida Atlantic University Medical Center since 2013. He is currently an associate professor in the Department of Pediatrics and Orthopedic Surgery at St. Louis Children's Hospital in Louisville, Missouri, and was co-founder and chairman of a pediatric pediatric podiatric research group at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.

His interests include spending time with his family and attending the school's local charity events. He is interested in preventing child abuse, maintaining families, and treating abused and neglected children, and is a member of the board of directors of the American Academy of Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgeons (APS). In addition to intercollegiate sports, Wheaton also offers a variety of extracurricular activities for the student community, which can participate in any semester. There are over 60 student bodies involved in sports and more than 60,000 hours of playing time per year in these sports. With a focus on getting students to forget athletics and a strong commitment to academic excellence in all areas of life, Wheaton offers students, faculty, staff and alumni many opportunities to get involved.

Thunder teams have won 79 conference titles and 31 college titles - athletes won national individual titles, and Wheaton was named National Player of the Year five times. If success was measured only by on-field performance, Wheatons has been at the highest level of college athletics in the United States for more than 30 years. Since 2000, four national champions in men's and women's athletics and two national runners-up in women's athletics have been produced. This year, his teams won six national championships and three national championships in baseball, football, basketball and football.

He believes that students-athletes learn character lessons through their pursuit of excellence, and that competitiveness is driven to be the best they can be to the glory of God. I believe that something that happens in the lives of our students reflects their character, integrity and commitment to God and to each other.

I know that this is a quality that requires a lot of work at Wheaton, as well as a lot of dedication and dedication to our students. Northwestern Medicine's Regional Medical Group is set to get back in the action. Athletics coaches, coaches and physiotherapists work with team doctors to treat injured athletes and ensure students recover properly to prevent further injuries. Sports medicine specialists are also responsible for assessing health, providing injury prevention strategies and helping people to live an active life.

This philosophy was born of God's great love, which calls us to compete with integrity and to demonstrate our discipline in the context of competition. We travel to countless countries to proclaim the Gospel at the service of competition, and this philosophy is reflected in our work as athletes, coaches and physiotherapists.

More About Wheaton

More About Wheaton